About

I’m Thomas Malkewitz (@dotps1), a System Engineer with a passion for automation and scripting, especially with PowerShell. I’m also the Founder/President of the Grand Rapids PowerShell User Group. I am heavily involved with PowerShell.org, and I am an active member of the global PowerShell community. I enjoy making PowerShell Wrappers for hard to use or dated DOS command line tools, and other applications that do not have PowerShell cmdlets. I also enjoy making helper functions that are missing from the core functionality of PowerShell for everyday use.

Projects

GRPosh - My PowerShell User Group website.

PSFunctions - A Github repository to hold the source for all of my Script-Functions that are available on the PowerShell Gallery. These are Advanced Functions that do not fit in any of my existing modules

WinSCP - A PowerShell wrapper that gives the feeling of working with WinSCP objects and methods in native PowerShell.

PSGist - A PowerShell Module used for creating and modifying Github Gist objects using the Github REST API.

PSWecutil - A PowerShell Module that wrappers the Windows Event Collector utility (wecutil.exe), to allow configuration to be much easier by working with objects rather than parsing string output.

PSAppVeyor - A PowerShell module used to interface with the AppVeyor REST API.

HPWarranty - A PowerShell module used to query HP and HPE for system warranty information.

Latest Blog Post

22 Jan 2018 . homebrewing . Brewing your own BrewPi Comments

Like most people, I found out how important controlling fermentation temperature is only after making a huge mistake and letting a batch of beer ferment about 10 degrees Fahrenheit over the yeast strains max temperature. And it was so horrible I had to dump it all, it wasn’t even close to drinkable. And I think my next actions where the same as most others as well, got my hands on an old cheap fridge (stand up freezer in my case), purchased an STC-1000 relay with temp probe, and built something I could control fermentation temperature...

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